Land Use at Privatized Australian Airports – Classification and Analyses

by Nicholas Stevens and Arron Walker

stevensIn recent years, the air transport industry has experienced unprecedented growth, driven by strong local and global economies. Whether this growth can continue in the face of anticipated oil crises, international economic forecasts, and, recently, influenza outbreaks is yet to be seen. One thing is certain: airport owners and operators will continue to be faced with challenging environments in which to do business. In response, many airports recognize the value in diversifying their revenue streams through a variety of landside property developments within the airport boundary. In Australia, it is the type and intended market of this development that is a point of contention between private airport corporations and their surrounding municipalities.

The aim of this preliminary research is to identify and categorize on-airport development occurring at the twenty-two privatized Australian airports which are administered under the Airports Act [1996]. This new knowledge will assist airport and municipal planners in understanding the current extent and category of on-airport land use, allowing them to make better decisions when proposing development both within airport master plans and beyond the airport boundary in local town and municipal plans.

vrom_logoIn collaboration with the Dutch Ministry for Housing, Spatial Planning and Environment(VROM) Aerlines Magazine is proud to present the publication ofonearticle about spatial planning and/or the environment, in the next four issue of this magazine. The objective of this partnership is to raise awareness and to facilitate the sharing knowledge by facilitating the publication of independent scientific research by prominent members of the scientific community.

 

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Landing an Airport? Airport Development and Strategic Land Use Planning in the EU

By Mariëlle Prins

airport-cityThis paper outlines the increased tension between traditional airport planning methods and economic reality in the airport area. Airport planning and increased (international) regulation have considerable effects on the surrounding areas. The quality of spatial policy and planning sub-optimal because it lacks to set the agenda, is not forward and outward focused and often fails to take into account the dynamics at and around the site.

vrom_logoThis article is part of the collaboration between Aerlines Magazine and the Dutch Ministry for Housing, Spatial Planning and Environment (VROM).Download PDF

Single European Sky and its impacts on CO2 emissions

Aaron Scholz, Patrick Jochem, Dr. Anselm Ott and Paolo Beria

Aviation has been subject to comprehensive changes over the last decades. Passenger numbers and freight volumes are booming. Adverse impacts are correlated to growth rates. One of the themes in the debate on external effects is the discussion on carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Promoted by the industry, the implementation of a Single European Sky (SES) is one step in reducing CO2-emissions in aviation. In this article Aaron Scholz and his co-authors examine the potential of a SES for in-flight emission reductions.

In collaboration with the Dutch Ministry for Housing, Spatial Planning and Environment (VROM) Aerlines Magazine is proud to present the publication ofonearticle about spatial planning and/or the environment, in the next four issue of this magazine. The objective of this partnership is to raise awareness and to facilitate the sharing knowledge by facilitating the publication of independent scientific research by prominent members of the scientific community.

41_Theiss

Locked-in Logistics (PhD thesis)

By Dr. Pim Warffemius

This paper is about the agglomeration effect of Amsterdam Airport Schiphol and its implications for location policy regarding the airport region. We focus on a specific case, namely the important concentration of European Distribution Centers (EDCs) around the airport. The traditional answer to the question why EDCs are attracted to the airport is due to the importance of having air transport services at their disposal. However, we show that this is only a partial answer and that economies of agglomeration are the most important determinants. Moreover, we show that the spatial economic development of the airport area needs to be accompanied by new insights concerning location policy.

This article is part of the collaboration between Aerlines Magazine and the Dutch Ministry for Housing, Spatial Planning and Environment (VROM). 

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