High Speed Train as a Feeder for Air Transport

ICE_TrainIlse Terpstra and Mark G. Lijesen

Air transport and high speed trains (HST) are seen as competitors in short to medium range markets. Recently, the view of HST and air transport being complementary modes has emerged. This paper extends the literature by looking at the impact of high speed rail on airport competition, focusing on the new HST-link between Amsterdam and Brussels. We conduct a detailed analysis regarding the airport choice of passengers living in the catchment areas of these airports and compared the results with airport choice in Spain, where a HST is already running.

Air transport and high speed trains (HST) are seen as competitors in short to medium range markets.Recently, the view of HST and air transport being complementary modes has emerged. This paperextends the literature by looking at the impact of high speed rail on airport competition, focusing onthe new HST-link between Amsterdam and Brussels. We conduct a detailed analysis regarding the airport choice of passengers living in the catchment areas of these airports and compared the resultswith airport choice in Spain, where a HST is already running.

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4.1 – Air versus High-Speed Rail in Europe

By Nicole Adler

adlerAdler provides research outcomes on an analysis of the competitive outcome of additional or expanded high-speed rail infrastructure on the transport equilibrium in the medium to long haul passenger market i.e. for trips beyond 300 kilometres. Among others, she concludes that it is only worthwhile improving the high-speed European rail network if the regulators are willing to subsidize the cost of the infrastructure upgrading. She also concludes that it is possible to set an environmental charge of €100 per flight and €50 per train service without dramatically changing the transport equilibrium, thus collecting approximately half the estimated environmental damage.

4.2 – Air/Rail Intermodality in Europe: Experiences and Prospects

By Wolfgang Grimme

grimmeGrimme discusses the relevance and importance of air-rail intermodality and integration in Europe. Policymakers often demand better intermodal cooperation. But such cooperation is not always free of conflict, as air and rail may both compete and complement at the same time. Increasing intermodality and integration may require considerable public funding. However, as successful air-rail integration has proofed to reduce pollution and congestion on and around major airports, such an investment might be justified.

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