Book Review: Foundations of Airline Finance by Bijan Vasigh

From frequent flyer programs to fuel hedging, this new book on airline finance provides you with a foundation in finance and in the application of these methodologies to various topics in airline industry practice.

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Ready for Take-Off? Financing New High-Tech Ventures in the Aviation Industry. The case of the Mainport Innovation Fund.

mainport_innovation_fund“In the rapidly evolving airline industry, emerging technologies could play an increasingly critical role in the delivery of real and perceived customer value” (Taneja, 2010). Taneja, the author of highly interesting books on the aviation business like “Airline survival kit” (2003), “Simpli-Flying” (2004) and “Flying ahead the airplane” (2008) pointed out that innovation is of major relevance for the aviation industry worldwide. Innovation means that new products, services, processes and business models will be introduced successfully to the market. In the field of aviation innovation can be related to the aircraft (e.g. new materials used, avionics and engine technologies) but not necessarily. Innovation is also the introduction of check-in kiosks at airports, new revenue models of the low-cost carriers, the use of social media by airlines and techniques for the decrease of perceived ground noise.  In this short article we discuss why it is not easy to bring an innovative product or service to the market related to the aviation business. But we describe also a venture capital fund initiated in The Netherlands that will support emerging technologies in this domain and speed up innovation: the Mainport Innovation Fund. The introduction of this fund could decrease the hurdles of starting entrepreneurs in the aviation business.

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See also the below presentation held by Ignaas Caryn, director Innovation & Venturing at KLM, about the Mainport Innovation Fund (in Dutch):

Airport Punctuality, Congestion and Delay: The Scope for Benchmarking

Airport performance benchmarking increasingly requires level-of-service (LoS) indicators for afair comparison among members of the same peer group. For a true performance analysis such inclusion of quality measures is necessary to differentiate airports with similar pure output quantities, i.e. number of aircraft movements. Since variation of scheduled times versus actual times could substantially cause accumulating operating costs for carriers and could furthermore pose the risk and inconvenience of missed connections for the passengers, this article examines determinants of flight delays at airports, and thereby developing performance indicators such as slot capacity utilization, queueing time and punctuality. The essence of underlying phenomena in queueing theory such as Little’s Law, arrival and departure distributions, and cumulative throughput and demand diagrams are briefly explained. This work’s aim is the exploration of ways of measuring and observing performance quality from actual flight schedules with a focus on usability for subsequent airport benchmarking and traffic modeling.


Aerlines from Past to Present

“Sharing International Air Transportation Research: The Short Haul Between Academics, Students and Professionals”

By Hubert Croes, Bram du Saar & Willem-Jan Zondag

To celebrate the 50th Issue of Aerlines Magazine, the editorial team has decided to give you a glimpse behind the scene of the development of Aerlines since its foundation in 1994. This article consists of three elements, sketching our scene behind the screen. One about the history, the second about our missions and goals and the third is about three small interviews with people important to Aerlines.

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